The Echidna Strategy by Sam Roggeveen | Black Inc.

The Echidna Strategy: Australia’s Search for Power and Peace

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About the author

Sam Roggeveen

Sam Roggeveen is director of the Lowy Institute's International Security Program. He was the founding editor of The Interpreter and is editor of the Lowy Institute Papers. Before joining the Lowy Institute, Sam was a senior analyst in Australia's peak …

More about Sam Roggeveen



Praise for The Echidna Strategy

'Essential reading for anyone interested in our nation’s security in an uncertain world where the enduring supremacy of the United States cannot be assumed or assured.' ––Malcolm Turnbull

'Here is a voice, bold in its conclusions and forensic in its logic, which defies the echo chamber of current strategic policy.' ––Peter Varghese

‘His argument is compelling ... a meticulous analysis of all the critical factors in issue here for each of the United States, China and Australia: national interests, capacity and will … it deserves to be heard, and taken very seriously indeed.’ —Gareth Evans, Lowy Institute Interpreter

‘The Echidna Strategy introduces readers to a number of innovative ideas on the Australian approach to defence in the Pacific.’ —Samuel Bernard, The Australian ‘Notable Books’

‘The views expressed by Sam Roggeveen in his new book, The Echidna Strategy, serve as an essential fresh approach.’ —Klaas Woldring, Independent Australia

‘Sam Roggeveen’s provocative book, The Echidna Strategy, offers a challenge to the orthodoxy that ANZUS is essential … Roggeveen’s contribution to this debate is a worthy one.’ —Georgina Downder, The Interpreter

‘[The Echidna Strategy] is worth reading.’ —Troy Bramston, The Australian

‘… a carefully argued case for how to defend Australia, from one of the Lowy Institute’s most cogent thinkers.’ —Andrew Leigh, ‘Favourite Books of 2023’